dwilliford | rupertmix
Rupert mix, Playing best of today and yesterdays hits. http://www.rupertmixfm.com
unknown
View all articles by rupertmix
Rupert Mix Online Radio
Playing the best of today's hits and the oldies.
Country,Pop,Classic Rock,Dance,Variety

Hey all. Check Out My Radio Station Rupert Mix F.M.! We rotate the unsigned artist with the regular playlist.

SHOW SUPPORT FOR THE ARTIST'S ...LIKE THE PAGE..! SHARE THE PAGE..! Thanks David
Added unknownadd/view comments (1)
no recent activity
Unsigned Artist
  • Ryan Adams' New Album 'Big Colors' Has Been Cancelled
    'Big Colors'
    Following revelations about his behaviour towards women...

    The incoming Ryan Adams album 'Big Colors' has had its release cancelled.

    Earlier this week the New York Times published an extensive report into the songwriter's behaviour, including allegations of manipulative behaviour and emotional abuse towards Mandy Moore and Phoebe Bridgers.

    Ryan Adams is alleged to have exposed himself on webcam to an underage woman, while Karen Elson separately divulged a "traumatizing experience" with the songwriter.

    The American artist was due to release three albums this year, with the first - 'Big Colors' - originally slated to land in April.

    Pre-orders for the record's vinyl edition had already been launched, but it seems that this release has now been cancelled.

    We await official comment from Ryan Adams' label on this matter.

    Join us on Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

    Buy Clash Magazine

  • Lolo Zouaï Picks Seven Songs For Single Gals
    Shake yourself out of single slumber...

    Lolo Zouaï has a dynamic sound, one that continually aims to fuse together opposing elements, and create something natural and true.

    Part of the writing team behind H.E.R.'s Grammy winning success, Lolo is rapidly coming into her own, saving her most precious material for her solo endeavours.

    Born in Paris, raised in San Francisco and now ensconced in New York, Lolo's wide-open creativity is helping her to ease ahead of the pack.

    In Valentine's week she's claiming her life as her own, and she wants you to join her - so here are her picks for strong independent women...

    Seven Songs For Single Gals!

    - - -

    Lolo Zouaï - Lose Myself

    “Nostalgia about my first and only love...”

    Beyonce - Me, Myself, and I

    “Nuff said.”

    Rihanna - Sex With Me

    “Realising that DAMN, you dat bitch!”

    Francoise Hardy - Tous Les Garçons Et Les Filles

    “Feeling like everyone around you is coupled up... except for you.”

    Dolly Parton - Jolene

    “When you’re jealous over a man who isn’t even your man...”

    Mariah Carey - Without You

    “I can’t imagine feeling this way about someone… maybe one day!”

    Amy Winehouse - Wake Up Alone

    “For those single folk on this lovely day. You’re not alone in being alone.”

    - - -

    Join us on Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

    Buy Clash Magazine

  • Lex Audrey Share New Album 'No Intention Of Changing The World'
    Crisp electronics with a thoughtful pop side...

    Austrian project Lex Audrey work on several different levels.

    Exquisite digital production, they match technical understanding to an appreciation for pop's possibilities.

    At times plaintive, at others outright anthemic, the group's music recalls everyone from Bon Iver through to Radiohead's genre-defying approach.

    The Vienesse trio - Niklas Pichler (vocals), Patrick Pillichshammer (drums and samples), and Lukas Staudinger (synth and bass) - recently released their new album, and it's becoming a word of mouth success.

    Lex Audrey vocalist Niklas comments: “It‘s hard to summarise this album in just a few sentences, as we worked very long and hard on it. A lot of the songs are very critical about how technology sometimes has a negative impact on society and the way people interact with each other. We don‘t know if our listeners feel the same way about it yet, but we can‘t wait to find out.”

    Tune in now.

    Join us on Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

    Buy Clash Magazine

  • Clash DJ Mix - ICARUS
    ICARUS
    Belting selection from the Bristol duo...

    Bristol duo ICARUS have always been that bit more immediate than some of their contemporaries.

    The minute you hear an ICARUS track in the mix it springs right out, with the pair's immaculate production ringing out loud and clear.

    New EP ‘This Must Be The Place’ is out now, launching another stellar year from a duo who have fast become vibrant fixtures in UK club culture.

    One of their strongest releases yet, ‘This Must Be The Place’ finds ICARUS sluicing together club tropes while adding a little melodic nous.

    Urgent and infectious, the EP has remained on our stereo since it was delivered, so we decided to ask the pair to craft a special mix for your aural pleasure.

    Opening with Bonobo's 'Ibrik' and including cuts from 16BL, Nora En Pure, and Franky Wah, it's a subtle but completely engaging selection.

    Tune in now.

    Tracklisting:
    Bonobo - Ibrik
    Asobitai - Mancore
    16BL - Vette
    King & Early - Moving Forward
    Tall Heights - The Deep End (Kaz James Remix)
    Nora En Pure - Harvesting
    Franky Wah - Get Me High
    Icarus - Running Away
    Baile - Amae (Sasha 1999 Mix)
    Rufus Du Sol - Lost In My Mind (Icarus Remix)

    - - -

    Catch ICARUS at the following shows:

    March
    23 Manchester The Deaf Institute
    24 London XOYO
    25 Glasgow SWG3
    26 Bristol Thekla
    27 Dublin Button Factory

    Join us on Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

    Buy Clash Magazine

  • Gareth Pugh and Farfetch Breathe New Life Into ‘80s Icon Claude Montana
    A star reborn for 2019…

    There's an exciting new drop from Farfetch and Byronesque, as the tech giant and vintage retailer have come together to reproduce a limited edition capsule of the most emblematic pieces from Claude Montana’s heyday.

    An inspiration to everybody from Alexander McQueen to Marc Jacobs, the groundbreaking French designer defined the silhouette of an era. While not the first to use those ‘80s shoulders and shapes, he was without a doubt the most memorable.

    “The 1980s really set the tone for design substance, integrity and craftsmanship,’ says Gill Linton, co-founder of Byronesque. “It’s so important to preserve those high standards of design and creativity.”

    Forgoing London Fashion Week for the first time in thirteen years in favour of the project, Gareth Pugh was commissioned as Creative Consultant.

    A clear admirer of Montana’s work, Pugh’s recent collections (cc: FW18) have featured strong shoulders, power silhouettes and oversized hoods with a daring use of leather.

    Given his admiration and strong desire for authenticity, Pugh went as far to use the same machines Montana used back in the day, of which only two remain, and the same cast of dressmakers and seamstresses to bring this collection together.

    To coincide with the launch of the capsule, Nowness has released a short film on the iconography of The House of Montana, with input from Duran Duran, Stephen Miller, Marc Jacobs and Gareth Pugh, among others who have known and admired him.

     

    Available at farfetch.com

    ---

    Join us on Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

    Buy Clash Magazine

     

     

     

  • It's Just About Pride: Lexie Liu Interviewed
    "I want my music to be real and true..."

    While Lexie Liu’s debut EP, ‘2030’, is a revelation in its own - meandering emotions and introspections with fluvial sensuality - there’s a particular moment on her track ‘Bygone’ that stands out. Perhaps the most autobiographical song on the album, it chronicles her experiences in college and the aftermath of her parents’ separation. Somewhere in there, Liu - born and raised in the Chinese province of Hunan - proudly claims, “One day, yellow skin can enter the White House.”

    “It’s a metaphor. It’s not like I want to be president,” she’s quick to explain. “It’s just about pride, you know.”

    Albeit brief, it’s an admirable instance, maybe even one of solidarity - from one Asian to another - but it’s not until you look at Liu’s oeuvre that the weight of the statement truly sinks in. Lexie Liu is made of pride. She comes back to it repeatedly: on the aforementioned ‘Bygone’; on the eponymous track ‘Mulan’ (after the sixteenth century warrior, not the watered down Disney version); in references to her time on The Rap of China, the hip-hop survival show that catapulted her to fame; and even, in many ways, the lyrical structures of her music itself.

    Calling it a defense mechanism, however, would be a doing flagrant disservice to Liu. Peel back the layers and you’ll find that her pride germinates from a place of communal strength: it’s the same emotion that fuels the lot of us resisting the proliferated stereotypes against Asian people - in school, at work, in Hollywood, and in music.

    “Pride is something I feel every day and my hope is for others to feel it in themselves too,” she says. “That’s why I like to talk about it a lot, so when people listen to my music, they too can feel it.”

    Lexie Liu is about as Asian as it gets, and there is nothing you can do about it.

    - - -

    - - -

    She’s also endearingly, characteristically twenty. It’s almost disarming: once you’re used to the sonorous, sultry echoes of her vocals, the feathery lightness and facetious colloquialisms in her voice give you pause. It betrays the fact that not very long ago, she was just a college student, hazing through morning classes in New York and wishing for something different.

    “It was a very boring life,” she recalls. “I was majoring in global business, because that's what my parents do, and I felt like majoring in business would make them feel safer.”

    She calls it “a very Chinese thing”: something tried and tested as a career, while music was relegated to a hobby, though she had spent a year in South Korea as a contestant on a music reality show, K-pop Star 5, immediately after high school.

    Naturally, college didn’t make her very happy: “I tried to transfer, so I studied really hard, went to different places for activities. I was under a lot of pressure too, with the schoolwork—I wanted to make music. I felt like Global Business was not what I wanted. I felt like music was the only outlet for me.”

    - - -

    - - -

    Liu left midway and headed for her motherland once again, participating instead in The Rap of China, the popular reality show that’s credited with injecting hip-hop into the Chinese mainstream, where she finished fourth. Before the season was up, she’d been signed to 88Rising - the US-based label spearheading the Asian hip-hop wave - and become the youngest Chinese artist to perform at SXSW.

    Liu, however, recalls having a serious case of impostor syndrome at the time: “I've always been very not-so-confident about myself. Seeing all these experienced rappers, who'd been in the game for like, ten years, and they're all my ‘shĩfu’ - I don't think there is a word in English - like a mentor. They were all there and competing with me, with very good skills. And I still survived somehow. I got very lucky.”

    - - -

    - - -

    ‘2030’, thus, is the culmination of Lexie Liu’s blossoming. An intimate journey where she constructs and deconstructs herself, wrapping up her ambitions, regrets, and desires in trenchant verses juxtaposed with crooning vocals. It’s the perfect artistic mosaic of a debut: extracted from her Asian heritage, from classic literature, from her own whimsies, and flitting from nonchalant confidence to unwilling resignation over the course of its tracks.

    “There are so many things in that album, but basically it's just a viewpoint for me,” she explains. “A little Chinese girl trying to put different things together and make a new sound; some of my daily over-thinking too. It might relate to people at some point. There's some heartbreak and stuff, too. A lot is going on there.”

    While her music is rooted in hip-hop and R&B, she’s never pigeonholed herself into either category. She prefers instead to experiment and sample different sounds into her songs: “To put this sort of tag on my music - I don't know, it's just a side of it. It has a lot of different elements from hip-hop, R&B, and Mandopop. I've been trying new things, trying to put them together and mixing languages and genres as well, both melodic and rap.”

    For Liu, it’s all about how the music flows, even as she goes seamlessly from Chinese to English and from knife-point rap to slow, sensual verses: “It's more like a flowy thing. It really depends on how I felt at that point.”

    Anything else, she says, would be “way too in the box.”

    - - -

    - - -

    The songs on 2030, thus, set rhythms that are eclectic, yet almost too familiar to the body, like the satisfactory image of someone expertly stepping stones across a stream, or beating their fingers on a table in perfect synchronization. She spins a cyberpunk fantasia in ‘Nada’ supplemented by trap beats, while ‘Hat Trick’ is peak dark, sensual Hollywood glamour, the lyrical equivalent of sending someone tumbling off the deep end.

    There are distinct dancehall and pop tinges to ‘Strange Things’ and ‘Love And Run’, while ‘Sleep Away’ - one of her early works - channels her R&B roots. Bringing it all full circle is ‘Mulan’, the song that, in some ways, started everything. Liu first performed it as a contestant on Rap of China and - though she didn’t have the popular vote - the power packed, spitfire rap landed her a spot among the Top 15 finalists, also making her the only woman to make it through.

    Almost a year later, she’s ambivalent when people call her the voice of modern China, or the Chinese Rihanna. It’s “very extra”, as she puts it. “I think it's like a two-sided thing,” she explains. “When it gets positive, I feel like I'm getting more recognized by people. I might have the chance to become someone that they said - I might. In the negative way, it's a lot of pressure too: a lot of eyes on me, and I have to be more careful and bossier when it comes to my music.”

    - - -

    - - -

    It’s something she’s struggled with since the early days, trying to come up in the “sausage party” that is China’s hip-hop scene, with success often darkened by clouds of doubt. “There are not many female rappers in the industry in China. There are a couple—we're friends and they're awesome, but in the show, there weren't. So, I felt that people started to feel like: ‘is she here just because she's a girl?’ Like, no one wants to watch a show full of guys.”

    She attributes much of her success to luck, although it does sound unfair for fate to have all the credit, especially since Liu is singularly aware of her unique position as an artist. While Asians in hip-hop is certainly not a new phenomenon, the interpolation has had its crests and troughs.

    As their music goes from being underrepresented in English-dominated markets to progressively global, Asian hip-hop artists have often been called out for their superficial treatment of the genre, for extracting the buzzwords and trends without understanding the connotations of either.

    More recently, fans have aggressively pointing out instances of cultural appropriation and racial insensitivity - in 2018, Liu’s label-mate and Indonesian rapper Rich Brian announced that he had changed his professional name from Rich Chigga to the former, explaining that he regretted previous stage name, even if he was young and naïve when he came up with it.

    Even in her native China - statistically one of the largest music markets in the world - hip-hop’s tryst with popular culture has been fairly recent. “Hip-hop wasn't a big thing when I was in high school,” she elaborates. “It only started as a big thing the year before last with the show 'The Rap of China'. When I was in high school, nobody listened to hip-hop. Nobody listened to R&B either.” The historical complexities of hip-hop, thus, often go overlooked.

    - - -

    - - -

    Liu, however, opines that merging Chinese culture with hip-hop would have to be grounded in real life instead of popular precedents. For Asian artists to excel at hip-hop, they would have to tailor their lyrics to tap into the collective Asian consciousness.

    “I wouldn't talk about stuff that I'm not qualified to talk about. I want my music to be real and true; it speaks my mind and how I see things,” she says. “Culture-wise, even if it is hip-hop and we didn't grow up in that environment, we can take something. Hip-hop has that swag and that confidence, and it gives people power in a mental way. This kind of positive energy could be brought in with my real story and my real vision.”

    To do that, Liu dives deep, often referencing literature that inspires her. Other times, she feeds on the energy of her label-mates. “They’re awesome,” she says. “They have this vision that I've always tried to accomplish, which is actually crossing over cultures and making this new movement that kinda extends the possibilities of music.”

    These days, though, she’s content with immersing herself in studio sessions, trying on new styles and exploring the possibilities of her music. Though she plays it close to the chest when asked about a possible tour, she does mention that she enjoys private venues, where the vibes are more intimate.

    '2030' might be done, but Liu has more things to say, sundry visions to explore. No other plans—she’s just going to keep doing what she does and create her own story.

    - - -

    - - -

    Words: Lavanya Singh

    Join us on Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

    Buy Clash Magazine

  • Premiere: Lavender Worm - 'Lasagne Rhythm'
    Retro graphics for a fantastically outlandish production...

    Lavender Worm is almost impossible to define.

    The producer's work has that wonky dancehall element, cartoonish electronics with plenty of spice, but then there's also an electrifying dose of trap, and elements of the Scandinavian skweee scene.

    'Lasagne Rhythm' is a gleefully inventive return, each note arriving with a beaming, day-glo grin on its face.

    Out now on Server Farm, Antony Barkworth-Knight has stepped in to steer the video, and it's a colourful display of retro graphics.

    Reminiscent of computer animation from the late 80s, the slightly 8-Bit feel works perfectly with Lavender Worm's neon-soaked production.

    Tune in now.

    Join us on Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

    Buy Clash Magazine

  • Premiere: Young Clancy ft. Chris LaRocca - 'Dead'
    A stellar collaboration...

    Young Clancy is building his own world.

    Currently living In Toronto’s Hallam neighbourhood, the producer and his painter and stylist wife Elise run an ad hoc studio, with a vintage shop also available inside.

    It's a sign of their ability to think outside the box, to join different disciplines and make something that feels fresh, but also completely inviting.

    Already one of Toronto's most sought after beat makers, Young Clancy has worked with breaking talent from across Canada.

    Releasing an EP of his own back in 2017, Young Clancy will return to solo duties this year, focussing on a flurry of different projects.

    'Dead' finds the producer sparring with Chris LaRocca, and the collaboration sounds absolutely effortless, the natural paring of two distinct talents.

    We've got first play, and you'll be hearing a lot more from Young Clancy in 2019. Tune in now.

    Join us on Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

    Buy Clash Magazine

  • Rina Mushonga - In A Galaxy
    Certainly worth the wait...

    The new Rina Mushonga is here, and it was certainly worth the wait. With four years of experimental craftsmanship poured into this album, ‘In A Galaxy’ embodies every inch of the title, as each track glides you through an interstellar journey, it’s spacey concoction of synth ballads creating a nostalgic shimmer of 80s pop.

    Buzzing with electricity, ‘Pipe Dreams’ opens the record with a dose of serotonin with it’s added touch of uplifting chimes and soulful tone. This rush of playful tranquility is further complemented by Mushonga’s vocals.

    ‘In A Galaxy’ is the eagerly waited follow-up to the singer’s 2014 debut album, ‘The Wild, The Wilderness’. It’s tracklist blasts rhythmic ska beats with specs of futuristic pop and harmonic vocals – a charming return for the musician.

    Throwing theatrical vocals on a dance beat ‘For A Fool’ is rhythmically similar to spicy album track ‘ Hey Coach’, a cut styled in androgynous vocals and buoyant sound effects. Title track ‘In A Galaxy’ swirls in spacious synths with dissonant and breathy vocals from Rina. Whilst tastefully swinging in reggae acoustics, the singer advertises her authentic background as she crafts a cocktail of varied music cultures and techniques into each track. 

    ‘In A Galaxy’ has an extra-terrestrial feel to it, but it’s also quite a joyus and playful ride. ‘4Qrtrs’ dropped as a single last year, and tampers with mechanic-electro beats – collecting a wholesome and fruity carnival vibe.

    Album closer ‘Jungles’ ripples together tropical guitar riffs and husky spoken word lyrics. Tastefully pieced together, ‘Jungle’ concludes ‘In A Galaxy’ with chopped and screwed sound productions and juddering beats, a wholesome way to complete an emphatically creative album.

    8/10

    Words: Laviea Thomas

    - - -

    - - -

    Join us on Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

    Buy Clash Magazine

  • Montreal's Saxsyndrum Share Dreamy New Cut 'Let Go'
    It captures the meditative process of songcraft...

    Creatively speaking Montreal is an anything-goes kinda place.

    The Canadian city's thriving arts community seem to specialise in holding down an enormous amount of differing roles, switching between disciplines at the drop of a hat.

    From this maelstrom come Saxsyndrum, a three piece who drift between indie, electronics, and pop, crafting their own voice in the process.

    New single 'Let Go' epitomises their free-spirited songwriting, with that supple groove underpinning an undulating wash of sound.

    Reminiscent of Arthur Russell a little in its approach, 'Let Go' has a meditative streak that muses on the nature of performance.

    Saxsyndrum explain...

    "'Let Go' was one of the last songs we wrote and it was interesting how quickly it all seemed to come together. By the time we started working on this tune, we all had a very clear sense of what strengths we each brought to Saxsyndrum."

    "The songwriting process then became much more intrinsic, more second nature. We had let go of our past overthinking and simply played, allowing us to put our emotions and states of mind directly into the piece. The resulting tune has a candid energy that really captures the at-times meditative process of songcraft and the spirit of our live performance."

    Tune in now.

    Join us on Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

    Buy Clash Magazine


sign in

Username
Password
Remember Me


New to IM faceplate? join free!

Lost Password? click here