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  • 10 million self-driving cars will be on the road by 2020

    SDC Installed Base

    Self-driving cars are no longer a futuristic idea. Companies like Mercedes, BMW, and Tesla have already released, or are soon to release, self-driving features that give the car some ability to drive itself.

    Tech companies are also trying to pioneer the self-driving car. Recently, Google announced that it would be testing its prototype of a driverless car on roads this summer in California. 

    In an in-depth report from BI Intelligence, we analyze the self-driving car market by analyzing the current state of the self-driving car and provide an in-depth analysis for how we see the self-driving car progressing over the next five years. Our in-depth analysis describes the economic impact that self-driving cars can have and look at the current barriers preventing the self-driving car from coming to market. 

    Here are some of the key takeaways from the report:

    • Self-driving cars are not some futuristic auto technology; in fact there are already cars with self-driving features on the road.  We define the self-driving car as any car with features that allow it to accelerate, brake, and steer a car's course with limited or no driver interaction.
    • We divide the self-driving car into two different types: semi-autonomous and fully autonomous. A fully autonomous vehicle can drive from point A to point B and encounter the entire range of on-road scenarios without needing any interaction from the driver. These will debut  in 2019.
    • By the end of the forecast period, we expect there will be nearly 10 million cars with one of our defined self-driving car features. 
    • Fully autonomous cars are further divided into user-operated and driverless vehicles. Because of regulatory and insurance questions, user-operated fully autonomous cars will come to market within the next five years, while driverless cars will remain a long ways off.
    • The biggest benefits of self-driving cars are that they will help to make roads safer and people's lives easier. In the UK, KPMG estimates that self-driving cars will lead to 2,500 fewer deaths between 2014 and 2030.
    • But the barriers to self-driving cars remain significant. Costs need to come down and regulations need to be clarified around certain self-driving car features before the vehicles fully take off among mainstream consumers. 

    In full, the report:

    • Explains our definition of a self-driving car and breaks down the self-driving car into five levels of possible capabilities
    • Sizes the current and expected self-driving car market, including shipment forecasts and expected installed base
    • Analyzes how both car and tech companies are approaching the self-driving car
    • Determines the benefits of the self-driving car
    • Assesses the costs and regulations preventing the self-driving car from coming to market

    Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

    1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now
    2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

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  • CHATBOTS EXPLAINED: Why businesses should be paying attention to the chatbot revolution (FB, AAPL, GOOG)

    bii chatbot ecosystem

    Advancements in artificial intelligence, coupled with the proliferation of messaging apps, are fueling the development of chatbots — software programs that use messaging as the interface through which to carry out any number of tasks, from scheduling a meeting, to reporting weather, to helping users buy a pair of shoes. 

    Foreseeing immense potential, businesses are starting to invest heavily in the burgeoning bot economy. A number of brands and publishers have already deployed bots on messaging and collaboration channels, including HP, 1-800-Flowers, and CNN. While the bot revolution is still in the early phase, many believe 2016 will be the year these conversational interactions take off.

    In a new report from BI Intelligence, we explore the growing and disruptive bot landscape by investigating what bots are, how businesses are leveraging them, and where they will have the biggest impact. We outline the burgeoning bot ecosystem by segment, look at companies that offer bot-enabling technology, distribution channels, and some of the key third-party bots already on offer. 

    The report also forecasts the potential annual savings that businesses could realize if chatbots replace some of their customer service and sales reps. Finally, we compare the potential of chatbot monetization on a platform like Facebook Messenger against the iOS App Store and Google Play store.

    Here are some of the key takeaways:Chatbots Explainer Report Cover

    • AI has reached a stage in which chatbots can have increasingly engaging and human conversations, allowing businesses to leverage the inexpensive and wide-reaching technology to engage with more consumers.
    • Chatbots are particularly well suited for mobile — perhaps more so than apps. Messaging is at the heart of the mobile experience, as the rapid adoption of chat apps demonstrates.
    • The chatbot ecosystem is already robust, encompassing many different third-party chat bots, native bots, distribution channels, and enabling technology companies. 
    • Chatbots could be lucrative for messaging apps and the developers who build bots for these platforms, similar to how app stores have developed into moneymaking ecosystems.  

    In full, the report:

    • Breaks down the pros and cons of chatbots.
    • Explains the different ways businesses can access, utilize, and distribute content via chatbots.
    • Forecasts the potential impact chatbots could have for businesses.
    • Looks at the potential barriers that could limit the growth, adoption, and use of chatbots.
    • And much more.

    Interested in getting the full report? Here are several ways to access it:

    1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now
    2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

    Learn more:

    Join the conversation about this story »

  • Google, Facebook, and other tech titans team up for VR (GOOG, FB, GOOGL)

    VR production

    This story was delivered to BI Intelligence Apps and Platforms Briefing subscribers. To learn more and subscribe, please click here.

    Virtual reality (VR) hardware makers Acer, Google, HTC, Oculus, Samsung, and Sony have teamed up to create the Global Virtual Reality Association (GVRA), a nonprofit aimed at “promoting responsible development and adoption” of the still-nascent technology.

    The group, announced Wednesday, intends to serve as a resource for consumers, policymakers, and industries interested in VR, sharing best practices, research, and technological advancements.

    Forming the GVRA lends a sense of legitimacy to the long-impending technology. In particular, it’s an acknowledgment that these firms are bullish on VR and AR, and the impact they'll have on a range of industries, including education and healthcare. This move is similar to one made in September by a number of tech giants including Amazon, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft, which formed the Partnership on Artificial Intelligence to Benefit People and Society (PAI). 

    The group could also encourage greater adoption of VR, which has been sluggish. This is likely due to a number of factors, including high price points of hardware, lack of awareness, and low quality of both content and hardware. Nevertheless, the environment is poised to take off in 2017, according to BI Intelligence. Moreover, hardware sales could exceed $50 billion by 2021, Juniper Research projects. 

    For this to happen, however, the highly fragmented and volatile VR space will need a transformation in the coming year. Developers, consumers, investors, and hardware makers have a host of options to choose from, each with its own strengths and shortcomings. This has made it challenging for developers to decide which form factor they’ll build for — games made for one platform often don’t play across others. And with adoption at such a low point, so far, forming a unified front for VR could help drive consumer adoption by offering the technology in a standardized and controlled manner.

    The virtual reality (VR) market has made significant strides throughout 2016. New VR headsets like the Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive debuted amid great consumer anticipation, while VR content launches kept pace, with Batman: Arkham VR and Chair In A Room garnering encouraging download totals.

    At the same time, industry groups and conferences brought developers, investors, and content producers together, helping to further ramp up buzz in this nascent space.   

    BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service, forecasts shipments of VR headsets to spike by 1047% year-over-year (YoY) to 8.2 million in 2016. This growth will help propel the virtual reality space to exceed $1 billion in revenue for the first time, according to research by Deloitte. Powering that growth is an estimated 271% increase in investment in AR (augmented reality) and VR companies from 2015, according to estimates from CB Insights.

    But while 2016 has indeed been an important year for the VR market, it hasn’t necessarily been a big one — at least not compared to its future growth potential.

    VR headset shipments will continue to grow in the years ahead, driven by the introduction of new content that will appeal to a broad swath of users. 

    Jessica Smith, research analyst for BI Intelligence, has compiled a detailed report on virtual reality that explores the highly fragmented and volatile VR market that emerged in 2016, lays out the future growth potential in numerous key VR hardware categories as driven by major VR platforms, and examines consumer sentiment and developer excitement for VR, presenting which headset categories and platforms are most poised for success in the near- to mid-term.

    Here are some key takeaways from the report:

    • This has been an important foundational year for the VR market. New hardware and content have brought more options to market to appeal to a wider set of consumers. 
    • But the growth seen this year is merely a foreshadowing of the future. The highly fragmented VR market today will eventually narrow as the market grows and matures.
    • After considerable progress in 2016, the VR market is ripe for transformation in 2017. Developers, consumers, investors, and hardware makers have a host of options from which to choose, each with their own strengths and shortcomings.
    • The environment is poised for the first killer VR app to hit the market sometime in 2017, which will be a major catalyst for consumer adoption of VR hardware.
    • Not all headset categories and platforms will emerge as winners in the near future. More immersive headsets that offer the best VR experiences are too expensive for most consumers. Alternately, affordable headsets that rely on smartphones as processors offer sub-par experiences that can induce sickness.

    In full, the report:

    • Identifies the major players in today's VR hardware and platform markets.
    • Estimates future growth of each of the major VR categories.
    • Explores barriers to mass market consumer adoption for each of the VR hardware categories.
    • Considers how developer sentiment is driving the growth of various platforms. 
    • Assesses how the market will shake out over the next five years in terms of size and the success of various VR hardware categories. 

    Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

    1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. » START A MEMBERSHIP
    2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. » BUY THE REPORT

    Join the conversation about this story »

  • Alphabet's self-driving unit seeks execs as it preps to become stand-alone company (GOOG, GOOGL)

    Self Driving Car Forecast

    This story was delivered to BI Intelligence IoT Briefing subscribers. To learn more and subscribe, please click here.

    Alphabet is hiring executives for its self-driving car project as it plans to move the group from its lab X to a stand-alone business within Alphabet, Recode reports.

    The tech giant is currently seeking a new real estate head for the group and has already hired a chief legal officer, which likely means that the self-driving project is no longer relying on X for these crucial operations and is now conducting them independently.

    As the company looks to move further toward deploying vehicles on the road in a nontest capacity, it's transitioning from a research unit into a full-fledged business unit.

    These moves appear to indicate that the project is maturing and inching closer to releasing a self-driving car for use on public roads. Launched in 2009, the project was one of the earliest of its kind, but it encountered difficulties earlier this year, according to Bloomberg. However, by October, the division had evolved and the search giant was preparing to make the project a separate, stand-alone unit within Alphabet; this unit would be releasing vehicles incrementally over the next few years, according to The Wall Street Journal.

    But here's why Alphabet likely won't release a self-driving car to the public until 2018 at the earliest:

    • Company founder Larry Page reportedly doesn't want to release a vehicle until it's entirely self-driving. The Alphabet CEO was reportedly holding back the project from releasing a vehicle until it has the capacity for full Level 5 autonomy, which entails, among other things, a vehicle without a steering wheel or pedals. BI Intelligence doesn't expectthe technology for such a system to be perfected until 2019 at the earliest.
    • The regulatory environment around self-driving cars may not allow the release of such a vehicle in the near future. The US federal government has yet to release regulations for self-driving vehicles, only recently outlining guidelines for automakers. Meanwhile, the federal government won't prevent states from crafting their own laws governing self-driving vehicles, representing another layer of regulatory barriers that self-driving cars must confront. At this time, vehicles for testing in most states, including California, where Alphabet is based, must include a wheel and pedals, as well as have an individual ready to take those controls.

    However, Alphabet’s project still remains a key benchmark for the market as a whole. The project is one of the oldest self-driving car projects in the market, and at this point the company’s vehicles have traveled over 2 million miles in total. While this doesn't mean that Alphabet will be the first company to bring a fully autonomous vehicle to market, it does mean that as the self-driving group matures as a stand-alone unit within Alphabet, its products will continue to be a key benchmark for the progress of self-driving cars as a whole.

    BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service, has compiled a detailed report on self-driving cars that examines the major strides automakers and tech companies have made to overcome the barriers currently preventing fully autonomous cars from hitting the market. Further, the report examines global survey results showing where fully autonomous cars are highly desired.

    Here are some key takeaways from the report:

    • Three barriers have been preventing fully autonomous cars from hitting the road: 1) high technological component prices; 2) varying degrees of consumer trust in the technology; and 3) relatively nonexistent regulations. However, in the past six months, there have been many advances in overcoming these barriers.
    • Technology has been improving as new market entrants find innovative ways to expand on existing fully autonomous car technology. As a result, the price of the components required for fully autonomous cars has been dropping.
    • Consumer trust in fully autonomous vehicle technology has increased in the past two years.
    • California became the first US state to propose regulations. California's regulations stipulate that a fully autonomous car must have a driver behind the wheel at all times, discouraging Google's and Uber's idea of a driverless taxi system.

    In full, the report:

    • Examines consumer trust in fully autonomous vehicles
    • Identifies technological advancements that have been made in the industry
    • Analyzes the cost of fully autonomous technology and identifies how cost is being reduced
    • Explains the current regulations surrounding fully autonomous cars

    To get your copy of this invaluable guide, choose one of these options:

    1. Subscribe to an ALL-ACCESS Membership with BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report AND over 100 other expertly researched deep-dive reports, subscriptions to all of our daily newsletters, and much more. >> START A MEMBERSHIP
    2. Purchase the report and download it immediately from our research store. >> BUY THE REPORT

    The choice is yours. But however you decide to acquire this report, you’ve given yourself a powerful advantage in your understanding of the emerging world of self-driving cars.

    Join the conversation about this story »

  • THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE AUTOMOBILE 2016: Forecasts, trends, and analyses on the disruption of the automotive industry

    Estimated Connected Car Shipments

    Over the past year, there has been a significant uptick in the number of connected cars on the road. And as internet integration becomes more commonplace, the automobile as we know it will transform.

    Over the next five to 10 years, this internet integration is expected to change the car ownership model, create a new platform for consumers to access content, lead to fully autonomous vehicles, and revolutionize the auto industry.

    The market position of the car today is similar to where the smartphone was in 2010 — it's just taken off and is ready to explode. 

    In a new report from BI Intelligence, we examine the transformation of the automobile. We examine all areas of the changing automotive market, including the market size for connected cars, automakers benefits and connection strategies, market leaders, consumer demand, and more.

    Here are some of the key takeaways from the report:

    • Over 380 million connected cars will be on the road by 2021. The market has seen a significant increase in automakers plans to connect the majority of the vehicles they sell and as a result, we've increased our 2015 forecast.
    • Automakers are connecting the vehicles they sell because the connection offers clear business opportunities.
    • Consumers are adopting the connected car faster than expected. We identify the 3 factors that causing the increase in demand.
    • Tech companies will play a major role in the future of the automotive market. The big question is whether tech companies will eventually manufacture cars?
    • Fully autonomous cars are only a few years away. Technological, regulatory, and consumer adoption hurdles still remain, but there have been many strides towards a car that can drive itself from point A to point B with little to no human interaction.

    In full the report:

    • Forecasts connected car shipments
    • Identifies automakers strategy for connection
    • Analyzes consumer interest in the connected car
    • Examines Apple CarPlay and Android Auto
    • Discusses the potential changing car ownership model
    • Describes the evolution of the self-driving car
    • Identifies top connected car and fully autonomous car barriers

    Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

    1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now
    2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

    Join the conversation about this story »

  • Here’s some good news for the beleaguered hardware industry getting killed by the cloud

    There's been lots of talk about the cloud taking over on-premise servers in recent years, as companies move their data online instead of storing it on their own hardware servers.

    That may be the clear long-term trend, but the cloud doesn't seem to be the answer for every company — at least for now.

    According to a CIO survey by financial firm Pacific Crest, 62% of the respondents said they returned to on-premise servers, after trying things on the cloud. Pacific Crest calls this a "boomerang effect," in which companies realize the cloud isn't a good fit yet and bring back their workloads to traditional on-premise datacenters.

    "Surprisingly, 62% have brought workloads back from the cloud, supporting the idea that cloud doesn’t work for everything and there is a need for on-premise," the report says.

    Screen Shot 2016 12 08 at 2.17.06 PM

    As seen in the chart above, the need for on-premise is more apparent among tech companies and large enterprises. That may be due to the various security and compliance issues they need to deal with, but it may also be a reflection of how big industry transitions like these take a long time to complete.

    For example, AWS, the de facto leader in the cloud computing space, recently struck a partnership with VMware to offer a "hybrid" solution, showing there's still huge demand for on-premise from companies hesitant to go all cloud.

    "We’re going through a gigantic transition right now from people running everything on-premise to people running mostly in the cloud, but that transition is going to take a long time," AWS CEO Andy Jassy told Business Insider after announcing the VMware partnership.

    Still, the Pacific Crest report said there's no denying that cloud adoption is an on-going trend and will continue to benefit the largest public cloud vendors like AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google.

    Screen Shot 2016 12 08 at 2.35.38 PM

    SEE ALSO: One of Amazon's most 'underappreciated' businesses is already way ahead of Apple and Google

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: In the 1970s the CIA created a spy drone the size of a dragonfly

  • The idea for Google's huge reorg came out of a secret Larry Page project called 'Javelin' (GOOGL, GOOG)

    Larry Page

    Google shocked nearly everyone when it made the surprise announcement that it was reorganizing itself into a conglomerate of companies called Alphabet last year, but the idea had been kicking around CEO Larry Page's inner circle well before that.

    According to a profile of Alphabet in Bloomberg, Page began offloading responsibilities for Google's core business to Sundar Pichai in 2014 and assembled his own group of close advisers to tackle wild ideas and new areas for Google to explore.

    Page called the group Javelin, according to the Bloomberg profile, where he came up with wild ideas like creating smart cities, which eventually became the Alphabet company Sidewalk Labs.

    In addition to crazy ideas though, Javelin laid the groundwork for a conglomeration of individual tech and science companies under the Alphabet umbrella. The goal of Javelin, and eventually Alphabet, was to stop divisions within Google from essentially competing with each other and force each various "Other Bets" that operate with their own goals, executives, and budgets, according to the Bloomberg profile.

    But a year in, things have been pretty rocky at Alphabet, as several of these Other Bets have shown signs of turmoil. Several top Alphabet execs have left the company, including former Nest CEO Tony Fadell, GV CEO Bill Maris, and many more. And at least one Alphabet company, Google Fiber, has seen its plans cut back significantly by Alphabet's leadership.

    The theme at Alphabet over the last year has been that CFO Ruth Porat is tightening funding on companies under her purview that can't demonstrate a path to profitability.

    Know anything about Alphabet? Email skovach@businessinsider.com. We'll keep it anonymous.

    SEE ALSO: We're asking tech execs the wrong question about fake news

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Here's how Facebook and Google's new 8,000-mile deep sea data cable will work

  • Top tech firms are forming a virtual reality supergroup

    mark zuckerberg virtual reality mwc headset

    Several of the biggest names in technology are joining forces to push forward innovation in the burgeoning world of virtual reality.

    Facebook, Google and Samsung are among the top tech companies to form the Global Virtual Reality Association (GVRA), tasked with promoting the global growth of the industry, which is expected to be worth $162bn by 2020.

    The non-profit group, which also counts HTC, Sony, Acer and Starbreeze among its founding members, will work together on research, share best practice and be aimed at consumers as well as those in the industry.

    "We’re still very much in the early stages of VR, so it’s critical that industry leaders work together to create and share ideas on how we can safely build this industry," said Jordan McCollum, general counsel for Oculus at Facebook.

    Google's director of immersive design, Jon Wiley, said: "The GVRA is a necessary first step toward ensuring great VR experiences for everyone, through collaborating on research and sharing best practices as the field grows and evolves. We look forward to working with our industry colleagues."

    It follows the creation of a similar group, also involving Facebook and Google, along with Amazon, Microsoft and IBM to focus on another new technology area - artificial intelligence.

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: This 360-treadmill is the future of virtual reality gaming

  • THE CHATBOT MONETIZATION REPORT: Sizing the market, key strategies, and how to navigate the chatbot opportunity (FB, AAPL, GOOG)

    bii chatbots_users

    Improving artificial intelligence (AI) technology and the proliferation of messaging apps — which enable users and businesses to interact through a variety of mediums, including text, voice, image, video, and file sharing — are fueling the popularity of chatbots.

    These software programs use messaging as an interface through which to carry out various tasks, like checking the weather or scheduling a meeting. Bots are still nascent and monetization models have yet to be established for the tech, but there are a number of existing strategies — like "as-a-service" or affiliate marketing — that will likely prove successful for bots used as a tool within messaging apps.

    Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds — services that don't directly generate revenue, but help increase the ability of brands and businesses to better target and serve customers, and increase productivity. These include bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service.

    A new report from BI Intelligence investigates how brands can monetize their chatbots by tailoring existing models. It also explores various ways chatbots can be used to cut businesses' operational costs. And finally, it highlights the slew of barriers that brands need to overcome in order to tap into the potentially lucrative market. 

    Here are some of the key takeaways: Screen Shot 2016 11 22 at 5.26.40 pm

    • Chatbot adoption has already taken off in the US with more than half of US users between the ages of 18 and 55 having used them, according to exclusive BI Intelligence survey data.
    • Chatbots boast a number of distinct features that make them a perfect vehicle for brands to reach consumers. These include a global presence, high retention rates, and an ability to appeal to a younger demographic.
    • Businesses and brands are looking to capitalize on the potential to monetize the software. BI Intelligence identifies four existing models that can be successfully tailored for chatbots. These models include Bots-as-a-Service, native content, affiliate marketing, and retail sales.
    • Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds, or services that don't directly generate revenue. Bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service can cut down on companies' operational costs.
    • There are several benchmarks chatbots must reach, and barriers they must overcome, before becoming successful revenue generators. 

    In full, the report:

    • Explains the different ways businesses can access, utilize, and distribute content via chatbots.
    • Breaks down the pros and cons of each chatbot monetization model.
    • Identifies the additional value chatbots can provide businesses outside of direct monetization.
    • Looks at the potential barriers that could limit the growth, adoption, and use of chatbots and therefore their earning potential.

    Interested in getting the full report? Here are several ways to access it:

    1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now
    2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

    Join the conversation about this story »

  • THE CHATBOT MONETIZATION REPORT: Sizing the market, key strategies, and how to navigate the chatbot opportunity (FB, AAPL, GOOG)

    bii chatbots_users

    Improving artificial intelligence (AI) technology and the proliferation of messaging apps — which enable users and businesses to interact through a variety of mediums, including text, voice, image, video, and file sharing — are fueling the popularity of chatbots.

    These software programs use messaging as an interface through which to carry out various tasks, like checking the weather or scheduling a meeting. Bots are still nascent and monetization models have yet to be established for the tech, but there are a number of existing strategies — like "as-a-service" or affiliate marketing — that will likely prove successful for bots used as a tool within messaging apps.

    Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds — services that don't directly generate revenue, but help increase the ability of brands and businesses to better target and serve customers, and increase productivity. These include bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service.

    A new report from BI Intelligence investigates how brands can monetize their chatbots by tailoring existing models. It also explores various ways chatbots can be used to cut businesses' operational costs. And finally, it highlights the slew of barriers that brands need to overcome in order to tap into the potentially lucrative market. 

    Here are some of the key takeaways: Screen Shot 2016 11 22 at 5.26.40 pm

    • Chatbot adoption has already taken off in the US with more than half of US users between the ages of 18 and 55 having used them, according to exclusive BI Intelligence survey data.
    • Chatbots boast a number of distinct features that make them a perfect vehicle for brands to reach consumers. These include a global presence, high retention rates, and an ability to appeal to a younger demographic.
    • Businesses and brands are looking to capitalize on the potential to monetize the software. BI Intelligence identifies four existing models that can be successfully tailored for chatbots. These models include Bots-as-a-Service, native content, affiliate marketing, and retail sales.
    • Chatbots can also provide brands with value adds, or services that don't directly generate revenue. Bots used for research, lead generation, and customer service can cut down on companies' operational costs.
    • There are several benchmarks chatbots must reach, and barriers they must overcome, before becoming successful revenue generators. 

    In full, the report:

    • Explains the different ways businesses can access, utilize, and distribute content via chatbots.
    • Breaks down the pros and cons of each chatbot monetization model.
    • Identifies the additional value chatbots can provide businesses outside of direct monetization.
    • Looks at the potential barriers that could limit the growth, adoption, and use of chatbots and therefore their earning potential.

    Interested in getting the full report? Here are several ways to access it:

    1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now
    2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

    Join the conversation about this story »

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