Hiroshi | hiroshiyu
Instant commission in your chosen account... http://payspree.com/r/44559
3 years ago

Loading...
Sokule / kulespace
Business Insider
  • 10 million self-driving cars will be on the road by 2020

    SDC Installed Base

    Self-driving cars are no longer a futuristic idea. Companies like Mercedes, BMW, and Tesla have already released, or are soon to release, self-driving features that give the car some ability to drive itself.

    Tech companies are also trying to pioneer the self-driving car. Recently, Google announced that it would be testing its prototype of a driverless car on roads this summer in California. 

    In an in-depth report from BI Intelligence, we analyze the self-driving car market by analyzing the current state of the self-driving car and provide an in-depth analysis for how we see the self-driving car progressing over the next five years. Our in-depth analysis describes the economic impact that self-driving cars can have and look at the current barriers preventing the self-driving car from coming to market. 

    Here are some of the key takeaways from the report:

    • Self-driving cars are not some futuristic auto technology; in fact there are already cars with self-driving features on the road.  We define the self-driving car as any car with features that allow it to accelerate, brake, and steer a car's course with limited or no driver interaction.
    • We divide the self-driving car into two different types: semi-autonomous and fully autonomous. A fully autonomous vehicle can drive from point A to point B and encounter the entire range of on-road scenarios without needing any interaction from the driver. These will debut  in 2019.
    • By the end of the forecast period, we expect there will be nearly 10 million cars with one of our defined self-driving car features. 
    • Fully autonomous cars are further divided into user-operated and driverless vehicles. Because of regulatory and insurance questions, user-operated fully autonomous cars will come to market within the next five years, while driverless cars will remain a long ways off.
    • The biggest benefits of self-driving cars are that they will help to make roads safer and people's lives easier. In the UK, KPMG estimates that self-driving cars will lead to 2,500 fewer deaths between 2014 and 2030.
    • But the barriers to self-driving cars remain significant. Costs need to come down and regulations need to be clarified around certain self-driving car features before the vehicles fully take off among mainstream consumers. 

    In full, the report:

    • Explains our definition of a self-driving car and breaks down the self-driving car into five levels of possible capabilities
    • Sizes the current and expected self-driving car market, including shipment forecasts and expected installed base
    • Analyzes how both car and tech companies are approaching the self-driving car
    • Determines the benefits of the self-driving car
    • Assesses the costs and regulations preventing the self-driving car from coming to market

    Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

    1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now
    2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

    Join the conversation about this story »

  • The US smart home market has been struggling — here's how and why the market will take off

    Smart Home Adoption Curve

    The US smart home market has yet to take off. Quirky's recent announcement that it was filing chapter 11 bankruptcy — and selling off its smart home business, Wink — highlights this well.

    At its current state, we believe the smart home market is stuck in the 'chasm' of the technology adoption curve, in which it is struggling to surpass the early-adopter phase and move to the mass-market phase of adoption.

    There are many barriers preventing mass-market smart home adoption: high device prices, limited consumer demand and long device replacement cycles. However, the largest barrier is the technological fragmentation of the smart home ecosystem, in which consumers need multiple networking devices, apps and more to build and run their smart home.

    In a new report from BI Intelligence, we analyze current US consumer demand for the smart home and barriers to widespread adoption. We also analyze and determine areas of growth, and ways to overcome barriers.

    Here are some key takeaways from the report: 

    • Smart home devices are becoming more prevalent throughout the US. We define a smart home device as any stand-alone object found in the home that is connected to the internet, can be either monitored or controlled from a remote location, and has a noncomputing primary function. Multiple smart home devices within a single home form the basis of a smart home ecosystem.
    • Currently, the US smart home market as a whole is in the "chasm" of the tech adoption curve. The chasm is the crucial stage between the early-adopter phase and the mass-market phase, in which manufacturers need to prove a need for their devices.
    • High prices, coupled with limited consumer demand and long device replacement cycles, are three of the four top barriers preventing the smart home market from moving from the early-adopter stage to the mass-market stage. For example, mass-market consumers will likely wait until their device is broken to replace it. Then they will compare a nonconnected and connected product to see if the benefits make up for the price differential.
    • The largest barrier is technological fragmentation within the connected home ecosystem. Currently, there are many networks, standards, and devices being used to connect the smart home, creating interoperability problems and making it confusing for the consumer to set up and control multiple devices. Until interoperability is solved, consumers will have difficulty choosing smart home devices and systems. 
    • "Closed ecosystems" are the short-term solution to technological fragmentation. Closed ecosystems are composed of devices that are compatible with each other and which can be controlled through a single point. 

    In full, the report:

    • Analyzes the demand of US consumers, based off of survey results
    • Forecasts out smart home device growth until 2020
    • Determines the current leaders in the market
    • Explains how the connected home ecosystem works
    • Examines how Apple and Google will play a major role in the development of the smart home
    • Some of the companies mentioned in this report include Apple, Google, Nest, August, ADT, Comcast, AT&T, Time Warner Cable, Lowe's, and Honeywell.

    Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

    1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally.» Learn More Now
    2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. » Purchase & Download Now

    Join the conversation about this story »

  • 10 million self-driving cars will be on the road by 2020

    SDC Installed Base

    Self-driving cars are no longer a futuristic idea. Companies like Mercedes, BMW, and Tesla have already released, or are soon to release, self-driving features that give the car some ability to drive itself.

    Tech companies are also trying to pioneer the self-driving car. Recently, Google announced that it would be testing its prototype of a driverless car on roads this summer in California. 

    In an in-depth report from BI Intelligence, we analyze the self-driving car market by analyzing the current state of the self-driving car and provide an in-depth analysis for how we see the self-driving car progressing over the next five years. Our in-depth analysis describes the economic impact that self-driving cars can have and look at the current barriers preventing the self-driving car from coming to market. 

    Here are some of the key takeaways from the report:

    • Self-driving cars are not some futuristic auto technology; in fact there are already cars with self-driving features on the road.  We define the self-driving car as any car with features that allow it to accelerate, brake, and steer a car's course with limited or no driver interaction.
    • We divide the self-driving car into two different types: semi-autonomous and fully autonomous. A fully autonomous vehicle can drive from point A to point B and encounter the entire range of on-road scenarios without needing any interaction from the driver. These will debut  in 2019.
    • By the end of the forecast period, we expect there will be nearly 10 million cars with one of our defined self-driving car features. 
    • Fully autonomous cars are further divided into user-operated and driverless vehicles. Because of regulatory and insurance questions, user-operated fully autonomous cars will come to market within the next five years, while driverless cars will remain a long ways off.
    • The biggest benefits of self-driving cars are that they will help to make roads safer and people's lives easier. In the UK, KPMG estimates that self-driving cars will lead to 2,500 fewer deaths between 2014 and 2030.
    • But the barriers to self-driving cars remain significant. Costs need to come down and regulations need to be clarified around certain self-driving car features before the vehicles fully take off among mainstream consumers. 

    In full, the report:

    • Explains our definition of a self-driving car and breaks down the self-driving car into five levels of possible capabilities
    • Sizes the current and expected self-driving car market, including shipment forecasts and expected installed base
    • Analyzes how both car and tech companies are approaching the self-driving car
    • Determines the benefits of the self-driving car
    • Assesses the costs and regulations preventing the self-driving car from coming to market

    Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

    1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now
    2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

    Join the conversation about this story »

  • Wall Street finally let Google out of the doghouse (GOOG, GOOGL)

    Dog

    Google is out of the doghouse.

    After whiffing in the first quarter, parent company Alphabet delivered rock-solid second-quarter earnings on Thursday, ballooning the stock nearly 5% and getting Wall Street back on the bandwagon.

    The company's core advertising business grew nicely, as did its fledgling enterprise play.

    If adjusted for foreign exchange rates, its year-over-year revenue growth saw its highest rate in five years, as did its US growth (both 25%).

    "How many other almost $100b revenue companies are accelerating growth rates to their strongest level in years?" Macquarie's Ben Schachter wrote in a note to investors Friday morning. "Simply stated, Google's core advertising business is gaining share from virtually everyone and its management team is containing costs better than expected."

    While last quarter's earnings whipped up a froth of doubt that Google's growth rates could withstand the switch to mobile and increasing competition from Facebook, Q2 shot down the naysayers.

    "Stepping back from the metrics, Google has been in the investor doghouse for the past three months following the 1Q EPS miss and concerns about decelerating growth rates in 2016," Deutsche Bank's Ross Sandler wrote. "These results go a long way to answering the critics."

    Meanwhile, Alphabet's "Other Bets" — like hardware maker Nest, life sciences company Verily, and superfast internet provider Fiber — still haven't shown signs that they'll be making money anytime soon. But with discipline exhibited throughout the balance sheet, investors don't really mind.

    From Schacthter (emphasis ours):

    "The bottom line is that in some ways, Google remains a one-trick-pony: it can target advertising better than anyone else. However, it turns out that being able to target ads better than anyone else is one of the greatest single tricks that any business has ever developed. Given its ability to generate cash, attract talent and, most importantly, make big long-term bets, we think investors would be wise to stick with the story and wait for it to come up with its (likely AI-inspired) next trick."

    SEE ALSO: Google beats, stock pops

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Elon Musk just unveiled Tesla's 'top secret' master plan — here are the details

  • Google finally fixed the most frustrating problem with its Maps app (GOOG, GOOGL)

    Rejoice! Google has finally added multi-stop trip support for its Maps app on iPhone.

    The feature has long been available on the desktop version, which made its absence on the app even more annoying for those of us — like me — who like to plan road trips on a computer but rely on a phone for navigation. Not being able to add multiple stops on the app was incredibly frustrating.

    The capability rolled out at the end of June on Android, but just got the iPhone boost on Friday.

    Just open the app, tap the corner menu, and click "Add stop." You can rearrange the order of stops by clicking on the three lines next to one and then dragging it:

    Mappping2

    Here's the GIF explanation that Google made for Android:

    Maps

    SEE ALSO: Wall Street finally let Google out of the doghouse

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: This country doesn’t have Google Street View, so they created Google Sheep View

  • Here's what $5 billion in buybacks got Google (GOOG)

    Larry PageGoogle parent company Alphabet said on Thursday that it has completed its first stock repurchase plan, spending $5 billion to buy more than 5 million shares on the open market.

    And what did the company get back for that? Three cents per share, according to BGC analyst Colin Gillis.

    He deems the buyback program a success because Google bought the shares for a lower price than where the stock is trading now.

    The idea of buybacks is to reduce the supply of a company's stock. That helps raise a stock's earnings per share, which in turn should help boost its price.

    Since Google announced the buyback in October, its stock has increased roughly 19%, including Friday's post-earnings pop. That compares to the Nasdaq's 4.9% rise during the same period and the Dow Jones Industrial Average's 5.4% rise. Not bad.

    And after getting a taste of buybacks from Google, Wall Street wants more.

    Gillis said that while the $0.03-per-share boost is just a small amount for the stock, he's hopeful that the $5 billion buyback is just a first of more to come.

    "I expect we may see another buyback next time the board meets," Gillis says.

    With $78 billion in cash and short-term securities on its balance sheet, Google can do another $5 billion repurchase "pretty easily," he says.

    Asked about the potential for another buyback during Google's earnings conference call on Thursday, CFO Ruth Porat said that the company always reviews its balance sheet and capital requirements with the board, but that "I'm not going to speculate about a future board decision so nothing more to add on this point."

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: This country doesn’t have Google Street View, so they created Google Sheep View

  • Wall Street on Google: Buy, buy, buy (Alphabet)

    Larry Page

    After Google's parent company Alphabet beat Wall Street's expectations for its second quarter earnings yesterday, the stock shot up 5% in after hours trading, and has since leveled off. 

    Revenue was up 21% year over year and EPS exceeded estimates — $8.42 vs. the expected $8.03. The tech giant also upped its headcount to 66,575, which is a big leap from last year when the company totaled 57,148. All around, Alphabet had an exceptionally healthy Q2. 

    In more good news for Alphabet, the majority of analysts are bullish on the company. Here are some of the key takeaways from those who cover the stock:

    Macquarie: BULLISH

    Rating: Outperform

    Price Target: $975

    Comment: "The drivers and the results were quite similar to Q1, as mobile, YouTube, and programmatic drove top line outperformance and better than expected cost controls helped bottom line outperformance. U.S. and overall FX-adj y/y rev growth of 25%, respectively, were the best in five years. How many other almost $100b revenue companies are accelerating growth rates to their strongest level in years?"



    Nomura: BULLISH

    Rating: Buy

    Price Target: $925

    Comment: "Acceleration in Sites revenue owing to strength in mobile search, coupled with disciplined expense management, drove beats on the top and bottom lines. Alphabet's 2Q results support our thesis that the vast majority of incremental growth in internet advertising should continue to accrue to the largest platforms."



    Piper Jaffrey: BULLISH

    Rating: Overweight

    Price Target: $930

    Comment: "The report reaffirmed our view from last quarter that the Q1 underperformance was a temporary event and that the core business was healthy. Mobile continued to drive the biggest part of revenue growth and, while we are annualizing some beneficial ad format changes from Q315, the company is implementing some new text formats that could provide a new boost to revenue."



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider
  • The fun part of Google's earnings call is seeing Sundar Pichai in a wild hat and shorts (GOOG)

    Making billions of dollars is exciting stuff, but listening to CEOs talk about it to Wall Street analysts about it can be surprisingly dull. CEOs are cautious with their words. Analysts are wonky with their questions.

    So Google does something fun with its quarterly conference call that most other public companies don't. 

    It uses its own online service YouTube to do a live audio broadcast. Since YouTube is mostly a video platform, that means that Google has YouTube as a canvas to post charts, graphs, videos, whatever it wants as part of its quarterly call.

    So, it has some fun with these. It posts a photo collage of the Google executives speaking.

    Google CEO Sundar Pichai's collage is still pretty conservative. There's corporate-collared Pichai, Pichai on stage speaking, wearing a hoodie (that's code for saying he's just an ordinary geek, same as any coder).

    And then there's the fun shot, where he's wearing a wacky hat and shorts on a beach somewhere.

    Sundar Pichai collageCFO Ruth Porat's is a bit more fun. Besides the standard corporate photos, there are pics of her and her family through the ages.

    Ruth Porat collage

    But former CFO Patrick Pichette had them both beat with photos of him tandem skydiving, in ski helmet, bike helmet, and on a safari. He looked like The Most Interesting Man in the World.

    When he retired from Google in March 2015 to travel the world, his farewell memo shared on Google+ sparked a worldwide debate about work/life balance.

    In it he called himself "a member of FWIO, the noble Fraternity of Worldwide Insecure Over-achievers" and looking at the photos, you get a sense of it.

    Patrick Pichette collage

    SEE ALSO: What it's like to work for Google under Sundar Pichai

    SEE ALSO: Oracle just bought a company Larry Ellison mostly owns, entitling him to $3.5 billion in cash

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: We tried the 'Uber-killer' that offers flat fares and no surge pricing

  • The most interesting number from Google's earnings had nothing to do with advertising (GOOG, GOOGL)

    Diane Greene

    Google parent company Alphabet just beat Wall Street expectations on its Q2 earnings, sending its stock up about 5% after-hours. 

    Its cash cow — ad revenue — grew a healthy 19.5% year-over-year, while "Other Bets" like Nest and Verily continued to lose money on small revenue gains (losses of $859 million on revenue of $185 million). 

    But there was one area where the compay did show strong growth that wasn't related to advertising: Google's "other revenues." 

    That's where the company lumps together its cloud business, Play store revenues, and hardware sales. 

    This quarter, it hit $2.17 billion, up 33% year-over-year. That's better than the 24% growth it saw last quarter, or the 24% the quarter before that, or the 11% growth in the third quarter of last year. 

    On the earnings call, CEO Sundar Pichai said that that growth was driven primarily by Cloud and Apps, followed by Play, and then hardware (Pichai said Google has now sold 30 million Chromecast streaming devices in total, which means it's sold 5 million of the gadgets since June). 

    This strong growth comes nearly a year after Google hired Diane Greene to help it amp up its cloud business. Looks like it's working. 

    The company has said that it ultimately sees its enterprise business as being more important than its advertising business (and it even expects cloud revenue to surpass ad revenue as soon as 2020).

    SEE ALSO: Google beats, stock pops

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Elon Musk just unveiled Tesla's 'top secret' master plan — here are the details

  • The US smart home market has been struggling — here's how and why the market will take off

    Smart Home Adoption Curve

    The US smart home market has yet to take off. Quirky's recent announcement that it was filing chapter 11 bankruptcy — and selling off its smart home business, Wink — highlights this well.

    At its current state, we believe the smart home market is stuck in the 'chasm' of the technology adoption curve, in which it is struggling to surpass the early-adopter phase and move to the mass-market phase of adoption.

    There are many barriers preventing mass-market smart home adoption: high device prices, limited consumer demand and long device replacement cycles. However, the largest barrier is the technological fragmentation of the smart home ecosystem, in which consumers need multiple networking devices, apps and more to build and run their smart home.

    In a new report from BI Intelligence, we analyze current US consumer demand for the smart home and barriers to widespread adoption. We also analyze and determine areas of growth, and ways to overcome barriers.

    Here are some key takeaways from the report: 

    • Smart home devices are becoming more prevalent throughout the US. We define a smart home device as any stand-alone object found in the home that is connected to the internet, can be either monitored or controlled from a remote location, and has a noncomputing primary function. Multiple smart home devices within a single home form the basis of a smart home ecosystem.
    • Currently, the US smart home market as a whole is in the "chasm" of the tech adoption curve. The chasm is the crucial stage between the early-adopter phase and the mass-market phase, in which manufacturers need to prove a need for their devices.
    • High prices, coupled with limited consumer demand and long device replacement cycles, are three of the four top barriers preventing the smart home market from moving from the early-adopter stage to the mass-market stage. For example, mass-market consumers will likely wait until their device is broken to replace it. Then they will compare a nonconnected and connected product to see if the benefits make up for the price differential.
    • The largest barrier is technological fragmentation within the connected home ecosystem. Currently, there are many networks, standards, and devices being used to connect the smart home, creating interoperability problems and making it confusing for the consumer to set up and control multiple devices. Until interoperability is solved, consumers will have difficulty choosing smart home devices and systems. 
    • "Closed ecosystems" are the short-term solution to technological fragmentation. Closed ecosystems are composed of devices that are compatible with each other and which can be controlled through a single point. 

    In full, the report:

    • Analyzes the demand of US consumers, based off of survey results
    • Forecasts out smart home device growth until 2020
    • Determines the current leaders in the market
    • Explains how the connected home ecosystem works
    • Examines how Apple and Google will play a major role in the development of the smart home
    • Some of the companies mentioned in this report include Apple, Google, Nest, August, ADT, Comcast, AT&T, Time Warner Cable, Lowe's, and Honeywell.

    Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

    1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally.» Learn More Now
    2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. » Purchase & Download Now

    Join the conversation about this story »

Affiliate Resource Site
  • Cannot load RSS feed.

sign in

Username
Password
Remember Me


New to IM faceplate? join free!

Lost Password? click here