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Agnus Alexander | agnusalexander122

Numbers, Weight, Quality of Life and the Best Proven Strategies for Weight Loss

Jan 2nd 2014 at 10:02 PM

Numbers have long been the gold standard in medicine. In medical school, I was once asked by my attending physician what the laboratory’s Complete Blood Count (CBC) was on a patient I was following. Holding the patient’s chart at the time, I said, “Sure, I have them right here!”

His stern response was, “You should have them memorized! I had to in medical school, and so do you!”

Although my mind felt like responding with a one-fingered salute, I remained silent. A false memory on my part could lead to a serious medical mistake, but I still understood the importance of numbers in determining patient care.

Numbers may have driven doctors and their decisions for treatment of diseases, but patients (and the occasional medical student), on the other hand, are not so focused on that. People are more motivated by concern about their overall condition and well-being.

Because of this, questions such as, “Is your condition inhibiting your life? Is it making you less happy? Does it make it hard to cope day to day?” are now becoming more important to doctors.

The reason for this change is that people are more likely to manage their condition properly if they have goals that are more real to them than just numbers from tests. Being able to do more at work, walking up a flight of stairs without getting short of breath, keeping up with their children or grandchildren, and a myriad of other activities are very important. It’s all about quality of life. http://forum.maternal.com.au/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=211947

“Quality of life happens to be the element that is most important in motivating people to deal with an illness,” says Noreen Clark, director of the Center for Managing Chronic Disease at the University of Michigan. “People aren’t motivated to follow their clinical regimen if in fact it doesn’t improve the way they function and get along with others and manage day to day.”

If your excess weight is affecting your quality of life, here are the best proven strategies for weight loss:

In a recent study, researchers who evaluated the strategies of more than 1,500 successful obese dieters found that eating less fat, exercising more, and joining a commercial weight-loss program such as Weight Watchers or Jenny Craig helped obese individuals lose from 5 to 10 percent or more of their body weight.

“Despite popular perception that obese people are unable to lose weight, a substantial number of obese participants in our study did report successful weight loss, suggesting that some obese U.S. adults can and do lose weight,” said Jacinda M. Nicklas, MD, MPH, MA, the study’s lead investigator.

From a sample of over 4000 obese adults with a self-reported body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher, researchers found that 63 percent of them tried to lose weight in the last year.

Liquid diets, nonprescription diet pills (although prescribed diet pills used by a small percentage of dieters did show some success), fad diets and even most popular diets showed no association with successful weight loss.

“Interestingly, although participants engaging in formal weight loss programs may be required to consume certain diet products or foods, in our study, adults who said they used diet products were actually associated with being less likely to achieve at least 10 percent weight loss,” added Dr. Nicklas. “This suggests that the structure of being in a program may be more important. It is possible that some dieters may be overeating diet products because they believe they are healthy, or low in calories.”

“This study, though observational in design, supports weight loss through proper eating and activity — a fact that is often challenged in today’s quick-fix world,” said Connie Diekman, director of university nutrition at Washington University in St. Louis.

“Diet and exercise are reflecting a commitment,” said Keith Ayoob, associate professor of pediatrics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. “Without a commitment, there will be no success. With commitment to gradual changes, you keep your eye on the bigger picture and are able to accept that quick fixes are never the answer.” http://www.chiliving.com/forum/viewthread/13322/

Scott Kahan, MD, MPH, the director of the National Center for Weight and Wellness in Washington, D.C. adds, “The most important thing is to actually look for something that works for you, and this will be different for each person. Some people do well with low-fat diets because it includes the foods that they love and are satisfying. For other people, a low-carb plan may work better. It has to be individualized or it is just not going to be sustainable.”

Not one to be overly loquacious, Dr. Nicklas concluded, “public health efforts directing Americans to adopt more proven methods (such as moving more and eating less) may be warranted.”

 

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Numbers, Weight, Quality of Life and the Best Proven Strategies for Weight Loss

Jan 2nd 2014 at 10:02 PM

Numbers have long been the gold standard in medicine. In medical school, I was once asked by my attending physician what the laboratory’s Complete Blood Count (CBC) was on a patient I was following. Holding the patient’s chart at the time, I said, “Sure, I have them right here!”

His stern response was, “You should have them memorized! I had to in medical school, and so do you!”

Although my mind felt like responding with a one-fingered salute, I remained silent. A false memory on my part could lead to a serious medical mistake, but I still understood the importance of numbers in determining patient care.

Numbers may have driven doctors and their decisions for treatment of diseases, but patients (and the occasional medical student), on the other hand, are not so focused on that. People are more motivated by concern about their overall condition and well-being.

Because of this, questions such as, “Is your condition inhibiting your life? Is it making you less happy? Does it make it hard to cope day to day?” are now becoming more important to doctors.

The reason for this change is that people are more likely to manage their condition properly if they have goals that are more real to them than just numbers from tests. Being able to do more at work, walking up a flight of stairs without getting short of breath, keeping up with their children or grandchildren, and a myriad of other activities are very important. It’s all about quality of life. http://forum.maternal.com.au/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=211947

“Quality of life happens to be the element that is most important in motivating people to deal with an illness,” says Noreen Clark, director of the Center for Managing Chronic Disease at the University of Michigan. “People aren’t motivated to follow their clinical regimen if in fact it doesn’t improve the way they function and get along with others and manage day to day.”

If your excess weight is affecting your quality of life, here are the best proven strategies for weight loss:

In a recent study, researchers who evaluated the strategies of more than 1,500 successful obese dieters found that eating less fat, exercising more, and joining a commercial weight-loss program such as Weight Watchers or Jenny Craig helped obese individuals lose from 5 to 10 percent or more of their body weight.

“Despite popular perception that obese people are unable to lose weight, a substantial number of obese participants in our study did report successful weight loss, suggesting that some obese U.S. adults can and do lose weight,” said Jacinda M. Nicklas, MD, MPH, MA, the study’s lead investigator.

From a sample of over 4000 obese adults with a self-reported body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher, researchers found that 63 percent of them tried to lose weight in the last year.

Liquid diets, nonprescription diet pills (although prescribed diet pills used by a small percentage of dieters did show some success), fad diets and even most popular diets showed no association with successful weight loss.

“Interestingly, although participants engaging in formal weight loss programs may be required to consume certain diet products or foods, in our study, adults who said they used diet products were actually associated with being less likely to achieve at least 10 percent weight loss,” added Dr. Nicklas. “This suggests that the structure of being in a program may be more important. It is possible that some dieters may be overeating diet products because they believe they are healthy, or low in calories.”

“This study, though observational in design, supports weight loss through proper eating and activity — a fact that is often challenged in today’s quick-fix world,” said Connie Diekman, director of university nutrition at Washington University in St. Louis.

“Diet and exercise are reflecting a commitment,” said Keith Ayoob, associate professor of pediatrics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. “Without a commitment, there will be no success. With commitment to gradual changes, you keep your eye on the bigger picture and are able to accept that quick fixes are never the answer.” http://www.chiliving.com/forum/viewthread/13322/

Scott Kahan, MD, MPH, the director of the National Center for Weight and Wellness in Washington, D.C. adds, “The most important thing is to actually look for something that works for you, and this will be different for each person. Some people do well with low-fat diets because it includes the foods that they love and are satisfying. For other people, a low-carb plan may work better. It has to be individualized or it is just not going to be sustainable.”

Not one to be overly loquacious, Dr. Nicklas concluded, “public health efforts directing Americans to adopt more proven methods (such as moving more and eating less) may be warranted.”

 

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Please to comment

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